Press Releases

April 2, 2014

Museum of the American Revolution Releases Refined Architectural Plans and Secures Conceptual Approval from Philadelphia Art Commission

A new architectural rendering for the exterior of the Museum of the American Revolution.
Image credit: NC3D for Robert A.M. Stern Architects

PHILADELPHIA– April 2, 2014 – After working closely with a subcommittee of the Philadelphia Art Commission, the Museum of the American Revolution today released Robert A.M. Stern Architects' revised design for the Museum's new home at Third and Chestnut Streets. Upon review of the updated plans, the Art Commission granted Conceptual Approval. The Museum will go before the Commission in May seeking Final Approval.

The changes were made in response to the Commission's comments made during a February 5 meeting. They include the removal of the cupola, updates to the building entrance, and a large bay window and two exterior bas reliefs on the Chestnut Street side of the building. Overall the design has been simplified, unifying and strengthening its classical architectural style.

Michael C. Quinn, president and CEO of the Museum said, “We have appreciated the comments offered by the Philadelphia Arts Commission, made in the spirit of improving the design and producing a building that will strongly contribute to the urban dynamism of Philadelphia, and still serve the needs of a new, nationally significant museum.”

The Museum is scheduled to open in late 2016. To view additional images, click here.

About the Museum of the American Revolution

The Museum of the American Revolution (MoAR) will tell the complete story of the American Revolution (1760 – 1787) using its distinguished collection of objects, artifacts, artwork, and manuscripts. Permanent and special exhibition galleries, theaters, and large-scale tableaux will bring to life the original “greatest generation, and engage people in the history and continuing relevance of the American Revolution.

MoAR will be built steps away from where the Declaration of Independence was drafted, debated and adopted; Carpenter’s Hall, where the First Continental Congress met; Franklin Court, Benjamin Franklin’s home; and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolution. Millions of visitors from around the world travel to this historic neighborhood to learn about the birth of America. It will serve as a portal to the nation’s many Revolutionary sites, sparking interest, providing context and encouraging explorations that begin at the museum’s doorstep. MoAR is a private, non-profit organization.

For more information, visit www.AmRevMuseum.org or call toll free, 877-740-1776.

###